Video: Natalia Martín talks to Marc Smith and John Kelly about Social Media Analysis

I spoke about social media with Natalia Martín Cantero, RTVE blogger and professor in digital new reporting at IE School of CommunicationIE University in Segovia, Spain along with my colleague John Kelly, from the Berkman Center for Internet & SocietyHarvard University and Founder of Morningside Analytics. The video was recorded at the symposium on Transnational connections: Challenges and opportunities for communication.


In this video interview, John and I summarize the themes discussed at the symposium including the political implications of inequality of technology access and the literacy to use it.  John describes his efforts to map the global blogosphere and I describe the ways social media creates social networks that can be extracted and mapped.  What does it take to be a communicator in a digital media environment?  We discuss the privacy rights of public data and the use of data in ethical ways.  Not everyone with a fiber-optic cable and server room operates under ethical guidelines.  Given that digital communication is inherently traceable communication, could it be that not everyone should take the risks of communicating?    Digital communication makes messages more findable and available which is a virtue when you want your message heard widely.  It is getting harder to limit distribution of content to select audiences.  I like to argue that the destiny of all information is to be made public if only because information never becomes less public.

IE University has a YouTube channel with lots of interesting  video (in English and Spanish) related to communication, innovation, and social media.

Marc Smith joining Media-X at Stanford as a Visiting Scholar

I am joining Media-X at Stanford University as a visiting scholar.

Stanford University

I will work with Martha Russell and Chuck House in applying social network analysis to social media research.

You can email me at masmith1@stanford.edu!

Our next event will be in late July and will focus on the use of social media analysis for mapping patterns of investment and innovation.

Video: Interviews at IE University Transnational Connections Symposium in Segovia, Spain

In March, 2010 I had the pleasure of attending and speaking in Segovia, Spain at the IE University Department of Communication at the symposium on Transnational connections: Challenges and opportunities for communication.

The symposium is organized with Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.  I participated in a video interview with several attendees that was created to summarize the themes and topics discussed at the symposium.  The video includes my colleague John Kelly, from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University and Founder of Morningside Analytics, along with Adrian Monck (World Economic Forum), and Shanto Iyengar (Stanford University).

In a shorter segment several people were asked “What makes a good modern communicator”: here is my reply.

Here was John Kelly’s response as well.

More video is available from IE University’s YouTube channel.


Talk on Social Media at the University of Porto, Portugal, March 26th, 2010

Along with my colleague Eduarda Mendes-Rodriguez I will be speaking at the University of Porto next Friday, March 26th.

Hands-on Workshop – Social Media Network Analysis in NodeXL

This workshop provides an overview of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and its application to social media. The network or directed graph is a common structure in a wide range of different kinds of social media. Social Network Analysis is a set of tools, concepts, and techniques that can help measure a graph and the location and connection pattern of each component part.

Using NodeXL, workshop participants will learn how to take data from common social media sources (including enterprise discussions and online communities, Twitter, Flickr, your own email) and perform various types of analysis. Through this workshop, participants will:

· be able to understand the basics of SNA, its terminology and background.
· be able to transform communication data (e.g. Twitter, email, Flickr, message boards etc.) into network data.
· understand the different possible presentations of social networks, e.g. in a matrix or a sociogram.
· apply network metrics and visualizations to find clusters and key contributors in real world social media data.
· get familiar with the use of standard SNA tools and software in general and the NodeXL social network analysis add-in for Excel in particular.
· be able to derive practical and useful information through SNA analysis that would help design an innovative and successful online community.

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