ICWSM 2010 Liveblog, Day 3

Fourth International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM-10)

Michael Kearns Keynote

Experiments: Graph Coloring / Consensus / Voting

Topology of the Network vs. what was the network used for?

Voting experiments – similar to consensus, with a crucial strategic difference.

Introduce a tension between:

-Individual preferences

-Collective unity

-Color choices; challenge comes from competing incentives

Red, blue. People unaware of global network structure

Payoffs: if everyone picks same color w/in 2 minutes, experiment ends, and everyone gets some payoff. But different players have different incentives (e.g. I may get paid p if everyone converges to blue, but 2p if everyone converges to red). If there is no consensus, nobody gets a payoff

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ICWSM 2010 Liveblog, Day 1

Fourth International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM-10)

We will be liveblogging (when possible) from ICWSM 2010, going on now!

Keynote: Bob Kraut, CMU

ICWSM 2010 - Bob Kraut
implications for community design
-offline theories of socialization helpful, not definitive
-online communities can build in good socialization practice
-e.g. WP welcoming committee
Two Types of Commitments to Groups
-identity based groups
-bond based groups
Added Identity & Bond Features to MovieLens
Introduced Subgroups into MovieLens
Identity features that focus on subgroups
Individual profiles
bond-based design:+11% logins
identity-based design:+44% logins

Call for Papers – ICWSM 2010 – Washington, D.C. May 23-26

Here is the Call for Papers for the


Fourth International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM-10)
May 23-26, 2010
George Washington University, Washington, DC

Sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence

IMPORTANT DATES:
Tutorial Proposals: December 1, 2009
Paper Submission: January 8, 2010
Poster/Demo Submission: January 8, 2010

Paper Acceptance: March 3, 2010
Poster/Demo Acceptance: March 3, 2010
Workshop Submission: March 1, 2010
Camera Ready Copies: March 12, 2010

Featuring a keynote by:
Professor Bob Kraut
, CMU,
on “Designing Online Communities from Theory

Professor Michael Kearns, Computer and Information Science,
Univ. of Pennsylvania,
on “Behavioral Experiments in Strategic Networks”

Speakers in Special Sessions:
– Nicole Ellison, Dept. of Telecommunication,
Information Studies and Media, Michigan State Univ.
– James Pennebaker, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Texas, Austin
– S. Craig Watkins, Dept. of Radio, TV and Film, Univ. of Texas, Austin- Don Burke, CIA Directorate of Science and Technology, Intellipedia
– Haym Hirsh, National Science Foundation IIS Division Director
– Macon Phillips, U.S. White House, Head of New Media

Tutorial Speakers will include:
– Jake Hofman, Yahoo! Research,
“Large-scale social media analytics with Hadoop”

– Cindy Chung and James Pennebaker, Univ. Texas,
“Using LIWC to uncover social psychology in social media”

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Book: Online Deliberation: Design, Research, and Practice

2009 - ODBook-site-logo

The Second Conference on Online Deliberation: Design, Research, and Practice (OD2005/DIAC-2005) was held at Stanford University May 20-22, 2005. From that event there is now a book,  Online Deliberation: Design, Research, and Practice, edited by Todd Davies and Seeta Peña Gangadharan (CSLI Publications, November 2009).  All content in the book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.

I will call out a few of the many interesting chapters, one of which I contributed to:

Chapter 5: Friends, Foes, and Fringe: Norms and Structure in Political Discussion Networks (John Kelly, Danyel Fisher, and Marc Smith, pp. 83-93)

And two from colleagues who report on tools for facilitating political debate and decision making:

Chapter 6: Searching the Net for Differences of Opinion (Warren Sack, John Kelly, and Michael Dale, pp. 95-104)

Chapter 26: Online Civic Deliberation with E-Liberate (Douglas Schuler, pp. 293-302)

The book is a great guide to the many ways computer-mediated interaction technologies are being used to build consensus or tear it apart!

2009 - December - Online Deliberation Book Cover

Congressional Tweets Analyzed at UMD

Here is a great piece of social media research from the University of Maryland, College of Information Studies.

Prof. Jen Golbeck and Justin Grimes analyzed 6,000 tweets from United States Congress members.  They found some interaction but a dominant broadcast pattern of use with a focus on self-promotion.  The Washington Post headlines the results as “Tweeting Their Own Horns Study Finds Posts By Lawmakers Boastful or Boring”


Here is the video:

From the UMD News desk:
“A new study by University of Maryland researchers finds a
growing use of Twitter among members of Congress, but that
the purpose and content of their messages fall short of
improving government transparency.

Jennifer Golbeck, assistant professor in the College of Information
Studies, Maryland’s iSchool, a doctoral student and an undergraduate
assistant analyzed more than 5,000 tweets sent by 69 members of
Congress in February. They found that House and Senate members
were using the social media platform mostly to promote themselves,
rather than engage in dialogue with constituents and the public at large.

“Members of Congress were not sharing much new information on
Twitter, and there were few posts that improve transparency,”
Golbeck says.”